IDA LUPINO 100

Oh to be in New York now that November’s  here – or now that the Film Forum are celebrating the centenary of London born IDA LUPINO (1918-1995) with a 25 film season from November 9th to the 22nd, 2018.

From blonde ingenue of the 30s to tough Noir dame of the 40s and 50s, to her being the only woman director in Hollywood for decades, Ida’s career is well documented in this wonderful tribute.

I hope the  Forum has full houses and that there’s a loud round of applause when Ida’s name first appears on screen.

The series includes new restorations and archival prints.

Heaven!

If anyone reading this is attending,I’d love to hear from you.

And as if that wasn’t enough, Film Forum in the last week of November is screening 12 Rita Hayworth films.

(The Film Forum http://www.filmforum.org is a non-profit cinema since 1970.}

Ida with Rita Hayworth and Warren William in THE LONE WOLF’s SPY HUNT.

 

 

 

 

THEY DRIVE BY NIGHT

 

With John Garfield in THE SEA WOLF

 

With Raoul Walsh and Humphrey Bogart. HIGH SIERRA.

 

With Humphrey Bogart in HIGH SIERRA

 

 

With Richard Widmark in ROAD HOUSE.

 

With Robert Ryan in ON DANGEROUS GROUND.

 

With Steve Cochran in PRIVATE HELL 36.

 

With Edmond O’Brien in THE BIGAMIST.

 

 

With Jack Palance in THE BIG KNIFE.

 

With Dana Andrews, Sally Forrest, Thomas MitchelL in WHILE THE CITY SLEEPS.

 

Films Ida directed:

Frank Lovejoy, William Talman, Edmond  O’Brien in THE HITCH-HIKER.

 

 

Keefe Brasselle, Sally Forrest in NEVER FEAR.

 

Claire Trevor, Sally Forrest, Carleton G. Young . HARD FAST AND BEAUTIFUL

 

On set .THE HARD WAY.

 

15 responses »

  1. I liked Lupino from the first time I saw her – a great screen presence. And then later when I became aware of her directing credits, at a time when it was far from common for a woman, my respect for her rose again.
    Those images you added remind me that it’s been 30+ years since I last saw a Lone Wolf movie – there was a season of them run in the evenings on Irish TV back in the early 1980s – and I’d love to see them again.

    • She had a long career. Her TV directing credits are amazing. Still don’t understand why she never got more chances to direct features.

  2. Channel 4 also showed some of the Lone Wolf films some years back. The one with Ida is on You Tube but is too light hearted in tone for me. I was knocked out when I saw The Man I Love recently. Ida was outstanding as nightclub singer Petey Brown supported by a great cast including Robert Alda and Andrea King. The only drawback is dull Bruce Bennett as a four jazz pianist.

  3. Wow! The Film Forum is offering quite a fabulous line-up.

    Ida has visited my blog at least 7 times (I may remember something else before too long), and until I started counting them during this her centenary year, her presence was not a conscious thing. Ida is simply someone I can’t help admiring.

  4. Love that photo with Walsh and Bogart!
    Never understood why Ida’s career as a leading actress
    ended with the disturbing STRANGE INTRUDER (1956)
    A mis-fire to be sure, but Lupino is wonderful,as always.

    • Thanks for reminding me about Strange Intruder which I’ve never seen. Yes, she was all of 38 in 1956, why no more films. She turned to television, appearing and directing, but even her TV directing stopped when she was only 50.

  5. Always adored Ida, Vienna! One of my favorite Lupino films is one that’s rarely referenced – a little WWII service comedy that she made with William Prince (who was a low-rent Henry Fonda, I guess) titled “Pillow to Post.” Charming film and Ida is adorable in it. -J

    • Haven’t seen this one but I’m sure Ida could have done more comedy if given the chance. Pillow to Post gets good reviews on IMDB.

  6. Vienna, yes, it would be wonderful to be able to see all these fine Ida Lupino movies at the FILM FORUM and I’m envious of those who can attend. I’ve been a fan of Ida Lupino ever since I was a youngster. Channel 3 WREC-TV Memphis, Tennessee used to show THE BIGAMIST(1953) and THE HITCH-HIKER(1953) quite a lot during the 1960’s and ’70’s.

    She was one of a kind throughout her career as an actress, director, writer, and producer. She paved the way for all the women directors that followed her. Also, not just women, but many independent filmmakers. As a filmmaker she took head on some very controversial subjects.

    I always enjoy the photographs that you choose. Especially, the two from HIGH SIERRA(1941) and the last one as the director behind the camera.

    I would like to celebrate the very talented, fearless, and beautiful Ida Lupino.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s