NOW PLAYING – WINNIPEG – 1948

 

 

What an interesting  film listing for cinemas in Winnipeg on July 3rd, 1948. Names of some  of the cinemas include Macs, Uptown,the Deluxe, Paris, Valour, Kings. I bet most of them are gone now.

In 1948, Winnipeg (capital of Manitoba ) had two film classifications , ‘General’ and ‘Adult’.  Some titles such as Moss Rose, Desert Fury,  Casbah were considered Adult, while other films had the ‘ General ‘ category, like Copacabana, Miracle on 34th Street, Seven Were Saved. 

(Another Canadian state, British Columbia banned all horror films during the Second World War. And back in 1938, that state plus Ontario banned “Angels With Dirty Faces.” )

Of the new releases, I only counted three from 1948 – “I Remember Mama”, “ Casbah” and “The Mating of Millie”. The rest, The High Wall, Blaze of Noon, Living in a Big Way, The Homestretch were all 1947 releases. I guess it took a little longer for them to make the rounds  in Canada.

The Return of Monte  Cristo was a 1946 release.

”The Homestretch”, with Maureen O’Hara and Cornel Wilde is one I didnt know. It’s in color and on You Tube.

Only two films had no second features, only cartoons in support – Casbah and Call Northside 777.  The Rialto ‘s Susie Steps  Out was in support of Montana Mike, but  had the grand title of “Companion Feature”.

The Garrick cinema was holding over The Mating of Millie for a fifth week. Glenn Ford and Evelyn Keyes were obviously a winning twosome. (They made 6 films together.)

On the re-release front were Mark of Zorro/Drums Along The Mohawk;  Love laughs at Andy / Bowery Buckaroos;  It Happened on 5th Avenue/West of the Pecos.

The earliest re-issue was Street Scene from 1931. Swiss Family Robinson was from 1940.

James Stewart’s Pot O’ Gold was re-released in 1948 as “Jimmy Steps Out”.

I don’t see any British films which surprised me.

But wouldn’t you like to open your newspaper and have so many films to choose from!

 

 

 

 

Fred MacMurray, Ava Gardner. SINGAPORE.

(I preferred the Errol Flynn re-make , ISTANBUL).

 

 

 

One of the lacklustre IMDB reviews of “The Arnelo Affair” starts off: ‘The one about the housewife and the gangster .’

 

 

No wonder Fred Zinnemann wanted out of his MGM contract. They obviously didn’t realise his talent.

YANKEE FAKIR (1947)

As a member of the International Douglas Fowley Appreciation Society (Scottish chapter), I was delighted to see YANKEE FAKIR in which he stars.

Douglas does look very different without his moustache but he is the hero after all , so a quick shave was in order.

Douglas plays ‘Yankee’ Davis, who, with his partner,Prof.Newton (Ransom M. Sherman), travel from town to town peddling their wares from a wagon.

Yankee sells spectacles, watches etc but his partner is always trying to sell his snake oil tonic from Zanzibar.

They arrive in the little town of Mystic and Yankee is immediately smitten with Mary (Joan Woodbury) whom they rent a room from.

When her father, a border ranger ,is murdered, Yankee determines to find the killer.

 

Joan Woodbury, Douglas Fowley.

Yankee is a good  guy and when he comes across an old prospector  called ‘Shaggy’ (Clem Bevans) down on his luck and in bad health, he gives the old chap some money to get medical help.

Marc Lawrence is good as always as one of the bad guys who has been smuggling over the border. The head man is never identified though he is the one who killed Mary’s father.

Yankee  comes up with a plan to smoke out the murderer, and it involves Shaggy returning as a millionaire!

Clem Bevans as you have never seen him before! And this film provides quite a substantial role for old Clem. (Was this actor  ever as old as his characters!)

Clem offers $50,000 for the Worst Person in town, claiming he wants to find out how honest the town is before settling there. Of course the lure of the money starts loosening tongues and eventually the killer is revealed.

Happy ending all round.

This is a pleasant little film from Republic and directed by W. Lee Wilder (Billy Wilder’s brother). And a nice change of character for Douglas Fowley.

I liked Joan Woodbury (1915-1989) who was married to Henry Wilcoxon for over 30 years. She starred in the 1945 Columbia serial, “Brenda Starr, Reporter”.

Joan Woodbury

 

 

Yankee Fakir in support, but look at the advertising for The Two Mrs Carrolls! – “Kill Mad!……Love Mad!……Man mad!”

POSTER SET

GUNGA DIN         (RIOT IN SIDI HAKIM)

I came across these lovely poster covers from a German film magazine, “ILLUSTRIERTE FILM-BUHNE” (Illustrated Movie-Stage) which was active from 1946 to 1969, with 8000 issues published.

With the covers being so good, I expect the magazines had other good photos in them.

If any of my translations via Google Translate don’t seem right, do let me know. It’s always interesting to see how the American titles were changed abroad.

 

DARK PASSAGE.           (THE BLACK SNAKE).

 

QUEEN CHRISTINA.

 

BACKLASH.       (THE SECRET OF THE 5 TOMBS)

 

VERTIGO.       (FROM THE REALM OF THE DEAD)

 

NORTH BY NORTHWEST.         (THE INVISIBLE THIRD.)

Strange title. Mr. Kaplan is invisible, but what is the ‘third’ connection.

 

 

SUGARFOOT.       (A STRANGER CAME TO ARIZONA).

 

NIGHT PASSAGE.      (THE CLOCK HAS EXPIRED)

Can’t figure this one out.

 

RAGE IN HEAVEN.       (DANGEROUS LOVE)

 

HARRIET CRAIG.      (THE DENIER)

 

SINCE YOU WENT AWAY?  (WHEN YOU SAID GOODBYE)

 

THAT FORSYTE WOMAN       (THE FATE OF IRENE FORSYTE)

 

WOMAN ON THE RUN          (ONE KNOWS TOO MUCH)

 

EAST SIDE, WEST SIDE       (LOST GAME)

 

ALL ABOUT  EVE

 

THE UNFAITHFUL.     (ADULTERY)

RICHARD WIDMARK IN CONVERSATION

Richard Widmark. NIGHT AND THE CITY.

 

Re-watching NIGHT AND THE CITY (1950) reminded me that this excellent film and the riveting performance of RICHARD WIDMARK (1914-2008) received no Oscar nominations.

On the Blu-ray of the film is a very good 90 minute interview with Richard Widmark. It took place at London’s National Film Theatre in 2002.

After only one film, Widmark became a star. And he managed to quickly get away from typecasting after playing the giggling psychopath of “Kiss Of Death”.

Describing how he got the part in “Kiss Of Death”:

I was sent over to audition for that part and the director was Henry Hathaway, a very tough cookie and he didn’t want me for the part. He had somebody else in mind, but Zanuck said, test him……..eventually Henry became a very close friend. I did five more pictures with him.

The scene where I push the old lady down the stairs was the first day I’d ever worked in the movies.” 

 

KISS OF DEATH

 

    ”I loved the studio system. To me it was like a college, a great place to learn, and an actor has continuity of work.You did three or four pictures a year.

    (Darryl) Zanuck was a very good producer – he revered writers. He started putting  me in different things, like a western with Greg Peck, “Yellow Sky”, then “Down to the Sea in Ships” where I was the good guy. 

 

Richard Widmark, Gene Tierney, Hugh Marlowe. NIGHT AND THE CITY.

“We didn’t know we were making film noir, we were making a picture for a price.”

(What a waste of Gene Tierney and Hugh Marlowe in “Night and the City”. Both had minor roles and I can only assume they were brought over to the London shoot to make the film more palatable in America.)

 

Jean Peters, Richard Widmark.PICK UP ON SOUTH STREET.

“Sam Fuller (Director of Pick Up on South  Street) had a habit, instead of saying ‘Action’, he had a pistol he always carried – he’d fire the gun and that meant Action! “

 

As Jim Bowie in THE ALAMO.

“I always admired Duke as the definitive westerner – he just is the western. We never socialised but, professionally, we got along great.”

 

With John Ford and James Stewart.TWO ROAD TOGETHER.

“I loved Jack Ford. I got him in his later years – “Two Road Together” and “Cheyenne Autumn.”

There are three guys I would work with at the drop of a hat – Spencer Tracy, James Stewart and Henry Fonda.”

I always loved westerns. I was a movie nut from a very early age.. I had a wee Scottish grandmother who started taking me to movies at age 3!”

 

With Spencer Tracy. BROKEN LANCE.

 

On the McCarthy era:

“That period is a low point in American history. It never should have happened in a free society. So many of my friends were blacklisted. Zero Mostel, a close friend, couldn’t work for ten years. It was a terrible, terrible time.”

(Richard added that he was never a joiner.)

 

in addition to questions from interviewer Adrian Wootton, Richard answered many questions from the audience. He said his favourite films included LOST HORIZON, TO BE OR NOT TO BE, SOME LIKE IT HOT and “anything that Hitch did.”

He ended by saying “I’ve had a very lucky, happy life.”

If you had been in that audience in 2002, what would you have asked  Richard?

 

In 1954, Widmark wouldn’t accept another 7 year contract with Fox and ended up with fourth billing in “Broken Lance”, behind Robert Wagner and Jean Peters. He remained independent after that, including starting his own company Heath Productions.

His only Oscar nomination was for his first film, “Kiss Of Death”.  I think he deserved one for “Night and the City” and “No Way Out”.

He was married for 55 years till his first wife Jean’s death in 1997. He subsequently married Henry Fonda’s third wife.

With his first wife, Jean

When I watched this interview from 2002, I assumed Richard Widmark was in his 70s. In fact, if IMDB dates are accurate, he was 88! Amazing.

My favourite Widmark western, THE LAST WAGON.